Hidden Dangers of the Folding Step Stool

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The Safe Step Stool Guy gives you an inside look at how dangerous a folding step stool is and why they are an accident waiting to happen. <br><br>

An Aircraft Step Stool for Helicopters

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Aircraft mechanics have long struggled to work on helicopters safely when trying to get work done around the skids. So, how do you find a safe step stool to work on aircraft and helicopters? The step stools typically used around helicopters were either metal rolling ladders that weren’t small enough to get the mechanic into tight places where he could work on the aircraft safely or they were homemade steps made from a crate of some sort, milk crate, metal crate, wooden crate, etc… Some of the smaller step stools that have been bought at big “box stores” consistently disappoint aircraft mechanics and company safety auditors. Expecting a safe experience using this type of step stool for an aircraft step stool is unreasonable at best, very dangerous at worst.

What step stool do you use when working on helicopters? You sure don’t want to use a flimsy step stool with legs that can bend causing the step stool to become unstable or allow it to wobble. You can avoid these types of flimsy step stools by simply looking for a step stool that is rated for at least 500 pounds. That’s right, 500 pounds minimum. You wouldn’t believe the junk step stools that are rated for 350 pounds being sold as a safe step stool. Don’t buy any step stool that has legs of any kind, especially the folding legs. Legs will get bent, this makes the step stool wobble. When this happens throw your step away, it has just become a liability. The big thing almost every step stool is lacking, is how to keep the step stool from sliding on slick concrete or epoxy coated floors. Look for large rubber pads on the bottom of your aircraft step. The rubber pads should be large enough in floor contact area to keep the step stool from sliding, not small rubber pads that will wear out after minimal use. Last, but not least; if you’re going to use an aircraft step stool on the tarmac, make sure it won’t blow away in the wind.

Shure-Step is a stackable safety step rated at 500 pounds that has many uses; Seniors, bariatric patients, physical therapists, rehabilitation facilities, bus, train, aircraft and transportation drivers, warehouse workers, mechanics, and technicians, even children benefit from the stability and strength of the Shure-Step. Shure-Steps have a non-slip surface with height starting at 6 and 10 inches, and allows you to stack them to reach up to 16 to 22 inches high or more for a guaranteed safe reaching and stepping aid. Or you may check this site www.Shure-Step.com for you to choose from their various types of step stools.